• United States History to 1877 (HIS 121)

    This dual enrollment course introduces the history of the United States from its origins to 1877. The course includes the European exploration; development of the American colonies and their institutions; the Revolution; major political, social, and economic developments; geographical expansion; the Civil War; and Reconstruction.

    This is a Passport and UCGS Transfer course.

    • Credit hours: 3
    • Lecture hours: 3
    • Contact hours: 3
  • Civics & Economics (Grade 8)

    This course examines the roles citizens play in the political, governmental, and economic systems of the United States. Students will examine the foundational documents and principles with which the constitutions of Virginia and the United States were established; identify the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens; and describe the structure and operation of government at the local, state, and national levels. Through the economics standards, students will compare the U.S. economy to other types of economies. They will investigate the process by which decisions are made in the American market economy and explain the government’s role in the U.S. economy. The course examines personal character traits, such as patriotism, respect for the law, willingness to perform public service, and a sense of civic duty, that facilitate thoughtful and effective participation in the civic life of an increasingly diverse democratic society. Civic and economic education also must emphasize the intellectual and practical skills required for responsible citizenship. Students will learn to consider their own talents, aptitudes, personalities, and market demand as they explore future decisions.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for Civics & Economics.

  • U.S. History: 1865 to Present (Grade 7)

    Students will continue to use skills for historical and geographical analysis as they examine American history since 1865. The standards for this course relate to the history of the United States from the Reconstruction era to the present. Students should continue to develop and build upon the fundamental concepts and skills in civics, economics, and geography within the context of United States history. Students will use investigation as a foundation to delve into the political, economic, and social challenges facing the nation once reunited after the Civil War. This foundation provides a pathway to develop an understanding of how the American experience shaped the world’s political and economic landscapes. The study of history must emphasize the historical thinking skills required for geographic analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship. Students will apply these skills as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for U.S. History: 1865 to Present.

  • U.S. History to 1865 (Grade 6)

    Middle school students will use skills for historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. The standards for this course relate to the history of the United States from pre-Columbian times until 1865. Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography as they study United States history in chronological sequence and learn about change and continuity in our history. They also will study documents and speeches that laid the foundation for American ideals and institutions and will examine the everyday life of people at different times in the country’s history through the use of primary and secondary sources. The study of history must emphasize the intellectual skills required for responsible citizenship. Students will practice these skills as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by all of the standards for history and social science.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for U.S. History to 1865.

  • Psychology

    This introductory course is designed to give an overview of key topics in psychology and to explore possible connections of psychology to future study and careers. Topics covered include the history and methods of psychology, brain structures, mental disorders, stress, therapy, sensation and perception, sleep and dreaming, child and adult development, motivation and emotion, and social psychology. This course is designed to give students a broad introduction to psychology and to preview topics that can be further studied at the college level (such as AP Psychology or introductory college courses).

    This course utilizes standards and domains outlined by the American Psychological Association’s National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula.

    A Note About Course Content

    The study of psychology involves learning about and understanding information that students may not have encountered previously in a learning environment. Some of these topics include but are not limited to the following:

    • Human growth and development, including physical and behavioral changes
    • Human gender and sexuality
    • Drug and substance abuse
    • Physical and psychological abuse
    • Death and dying
    • Historical terms and treatments that are no longer considered acceptable

    Please be advised that it is not possible to cover the course topics without encountering this information. If students enrolled in this course or their parents/guardians have a concern with these topics, they should contact their school counselor regarding a course change.

  • AP Psychology

    AP Psychology introduces students to the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans and other animals. Beginning with the psychologists and perspectives that have helped to shape the field of psychology, students will explore and apply the theories, key concepts, and research findings from various subfields of the discipline. Topics examined will include biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; learning and cognition; motivation; developmental psychology; testing and individual differences; abnormal behavior and its treatment; and social psychology. In accordance with the principles of current psychological practice, this course will emphasize the scientific method and procedure, ethical standards in research, and critical thinking skills.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP Psychology.

    A Note About Course Content

    The study of psychology involves learning about and understanding information that students may not have encountered previously in a learning environment. Some of these topics include but are not limited to the following:

    • Human growth and development, including physical and behavioral changes
    • Human gender and sexuality
    • Drug and substance abuse
    • Physical and psychological abuse
    • Death and dying
    • Historical terms and treatments that are no longer considered acceptable

    Please be advised that it is not possible to cover the course topics without encountering this information. If students enrolled in this course or their parents/guardians have a concern with these topics, they should contact their school counselor regarding a course change.

  • African American History

    In this course, students will examine the role African Americans have played in American history. The activities and assignments in the course promote cultural awareness and critical thinking through the lenses of power, politics, economics, and geography. The course traces the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of race relations in the United States. Students will identify and understand the African origins and developments of the Black experience in North America; evaluate how African Americans have shaped, have contributed, and have been shaped by the institutions, policies, and laws established by federal, state, and local governments; evaluate and interpret the various paths of civic responsibility that led to quests for equality, justice, and freedom for individuals and communities facing barriers and oppression based on race, class, and gender; and analyze and understand how the institution of slavery in the United States shaped beliefs about race and the supremacy of one race over another and influenced America’s economy and politics.

  • AP U.S. History

    AP U.S. History is a college-level course that combines learning factual knowledge with developing analytical skills. Emphasis is given to developing interpretive writing skills while assessing historical material according to relevance, reliability, and importance by weighing the evidence presented in historical scholarship. Heavy emphasis is given to essay writing and developing superior writing skills. The course includes materials and assignments ranging from discovery and settlement to present-day America, focusing on political, economic, diplomatic, and social history. 

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP United States History.

  • Virginia & U.S. History

    The goal of this course is to provide an overview of Virginia and United States history, from exploration and colonization to the present day. The course offers students the opportunity to think about our past in a new way and to better understand how yesterday’s actions will impact the present and future. In addition to preparing students for the Virginia’s SOL test in U.S. History, this course will also help students in better developing their research, writing, and analytical skills, which will serve them academically and in their future careers.

    This course aligns to the Virginia Standards of Learning for Virginia & U.S. History.

  • AP World History: Modern

    This course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university world history course in which students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP World History: Modern.