• College Composition I (ENG 111)

    In this dual enrollment course, students are introduced to and prepared for the critical processes and fundamentals of writing in academic and professional contexts. The course teaches the use of print and digital technologies to promote inquiry. Students are required to produce a variety of academic texts, totaling at least 4500 words (15 pages typed) of polished writing. This course requires proficiency in using word processing and learning management software.

    This is a Passport and UCGS Transfer course.

    • Credit hours: 3
    • Lecture hours: 3
    • Contact hours: 3
  • English 8

    In eighth grade, students continue to build upon skills previously learned in earlier grades. There is a continued emphasis on reading comprehension by comparing fiction and nonfiction texts. In fiction texts, students will explain the development of themes, and compare and contrast authors’ styles. In eighth grade, there will be an increased emphasis on nonfiction reading, and students will analyze authors’ qualifications, point of view, and style. The student will continue the study of word origins, roots, connotations, and denotations. The student will also plan, draft, revise, and edit while writing in a variety of forms, with an emphasis on expository and persuasive writing. Students will compose a thesis statement and defend a position with reasons and evidence. Students will evaluate, analyze, develop, and produce media messages. Students will create multimodal presentations that include different points of view and collaborate with others to exchange ideas, make decisions, and solve problems. The student will apply research techniques to analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions and possible bias. Students will also cite primary and secondary sources using either the MLA or APA styles. As in earlier grades, the meaning and consequences of plagiarism will be stressed.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for English 8.

  • English 7

    In seventh grade, students continue to build upon skills previously taught in earlier grades. There is a continued emphasis on reading comprehension by comparing fiction and nonfiction texts. In fiction texts, students will identify elements of a variety of genres while focusing on an author’s style. In seventh grade, there is an increased emphasis on nonfiction reading, and students will identify the source, point-of-view, and purpose of texts. The student will continue the study of word origins and roots and begin identifying connotations. The student will also plan, draft, revise, and edit writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on expository and persuasive writing. Students will write to develop and modify a central idea, tone, and voice to fit the audience and purpose. Students will continue to deliver multimodal presentations individually and in collaborative groups. Students will also interpret information presented in diverse media formats. Students share responsibility for collaborative work—as both a contributor and a facilitator—while working for consensus to accomplish goals. The student will apply research techniques to quote, summarize, and paraphrase research findings while properly citing sources. As in earlier grades, the meaning and consequences of plagiarism will be stressed.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for English 7.

  • English 6

    In sixth grade, students continue to build upon skills previously taught in earlier grades. There is a continued emphasis on reading comprehension by comparing fiction and nonfiction texts. In fiction texts, students will identify elements of narrative structure including identifying themes and analyzing figurative language. In sixth grade, there is an increased emphasis on nonfiction reading by creating objective summaries and drawing inferences using textual evidence. The student will begin the study of word origins and continue vocabulary development. The student will also plan, draft, revise, and edit writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on narrative and reflective writing. Students will continue to deliver multimodal presentations individually and in collaborative groups. Students will also interpret information presented in diverse media formats. The student will find, evaluate, and select appropriate resources for a research product and cite both primary and secondary sources. As in earlier grades, the meaning and consequences of plagiarism will be stressed.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for English 6.

  • Journalism

    Students in this course gain an introduction to the field of journalism and the practical, ethical, technical, and career-related knowledge and skills needed to begin a journalism career. Students learn how to write for news media and how to professionally conduct research and interview subjects. Instruction also includes the history and current landscape of journalism, the different types of news coverage, the various types of news media, ethical reporting, the basics of media law, and an introduction to layout, design, and photography.

    This course requires students to learn and write content according to professional standards, including the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and Associated Press Style.

  • Creative Writing

    Creative Writing offers a broad survey of fictional and nonfictional forms of writing techniques and skills, and practice in original writings, peer review, and revision. Students will write in a variety of forms, including autobiography, poetry, drama, fiction, creative nonfiction, and digital storytelling. Students produce a portfolio of work, which includes reflections on the writing process, a biography, and revised student work.

  • World Mythology

    This course introduces the academic study of mythology through an examination of the role archetypes play in the development of a culture’s spiritual perspective as sources of myths. Literary elements such as symbols, themes, and plots of myths are analyzed, enabling the student to identify common characteristics and patterns in myths originating in various cultures and ancient religions throughout human history. The course explores the myths of the cultures and religions of Norway, Egypt, Africa, Native Americans, Great Britain, Greece, Rome, and China.

    This course surveys the various cultures and stories of world mythology. Throughout the course, students dive into several of the oldest mythologies, including those of ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, and Scandinavia. Students also study how mythology has shaped Native American cultures in the United States. Students explore other mythologies through research-based projects, analyze these stories as works of literature and of history, and examine how these stories of mythology have helped to develop other forms of literature, such as legends, fables, and fairy tales.

  • Introduction to the English Language I (ESOL)

    A primary goal of this course is to help students understand, read, write, and speak English in order to communicate in social settings, to achieve academically in all subject areas, and to behave in socially and culturally appropriate ways. In order to realize these goals, ESOL students require meaningful oral language practice. In addition to the skills acquired in this course, regular reinforcement of English skills in the home and community can be instrumental in helping students become proficient in the English language. 

    This course aligns with the WIDA English Language Development Standards, 2020.

  • AP English Language & Composition

    AP English Language & Composition is a writing-intensive course that focuses on creating civically engaged, critically thinking, reflective writers able to analyze and implement strong rhetoric. Students will read and analyze specific pieces of nonfiction and fiction from a variety of time periods and genres in context of their rhetorical strategies, including rhetorical appeals, organization, tone, diction, logical fallacies, counter-arguments, refutations, characterization, structure and organization, and literary devices. The course will focus on improving students’ persuasive writing skills, culminating in a formal, MLA-formatted research paper.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP English Language & Composition.

  • English 12

    In English 12, students write informative, expository, and persuasive essays and produce a well-documented research paper. During the writing process, students demonstrate their understanding of grammatical conventions and practice techniques for improving their writing style and fluency. A survey of British literature helps students relate to the political, social, and philosophical perspectives of each historical period.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for English 12.