• Virginia & U.S. History

    The goal of this course is to provide an overview of Virginia and United States history, from exploration and colonization to the present day. The course offers students the opportunity to think about our past in a new way and to better understand how yesterday’s actions will impact the present and future. In addition to preparing students for the Virginia’s SOL test in U.S. History, this course will also help students in better developing their research, writing, and analytical skills, which will serve them academically and in their future careers.

    This course aligns to the Virginia Standards of Learning for Virginia & U.S. History.

  • AP World History: Modern

    This course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university world history course in which students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP World History: Modern.

  • AP European History

    From the College Board: “In AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world, economic and commercial development, cultural and intellectual development, states and other institutions of power, social organization and development, national and European identity, and technological and scientific innovations.”

    —Source: AP European History Course and Exam Description—Fall 2019, via College Board

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP European History.

  • World History & Geography: 1500 A.D. to the Present

    This course enables students to explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from 1500 A.D. to the present. Students will learn how the world shifted from medieval ways of life and thinking to “modern” thought and action. Content will begin with the Renaissance in Italy and extend to the modern day, examining politics and government, economics, military, society, and culture.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for World History & Geography 1500–Present.

  • World History & Geography to 1500 A.D.

    In this course, students take a journey back in time to explore civilizations, world events, and notable people from prehistory through 1500 A.D. The course begins with the Paleolithic time period and the dawn of humankind, then moves to examine ancient river valley civilizations, like Mesopotamia and Egypt, ancient India and China, classical Greece and Rome, the Byzantine Empire, early Russia, the Islamic Empire, early African and American civilizations, and Europe during the Middle Ages. Culminating with the Renaissance, World History I features information about the birth and growth of the five major world religions and centralized political entities.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for World History & Geography to 1500.

  • AP Human Geography

    AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. In this course, students will study diverse peoples and areas organized around concepts like location and place, scale, pattern, spatial organization, and regionalization.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP Comparative Government and Politics.

  • World Geography

    In this course, students will focus on the study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with an emphasis on world regions. Using geographic resources, students will employ inquiry, research, and technology skills to ask and answer geographic questions. In particular, students will apply geographic concepts and skills to their daily lives.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for World Geography.

  • AP Comparative Government & Politics

    AP Comparative Government & Politics introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures, policies, and political, economic, and social challenges of six selected countries: China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Students compare the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues by examining how different governments solve similar problems. They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments.

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP Comparative Government and Politics.

  • AP U.S. Government & Politics

    AP U.S. Government & Politics is designed to present students with an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States, tracing the history, development, and nature of U.S. governmental institutions and processes, as well as societal perspectives and behaviors related to such institutions and processes (and influences on those perspectives and behaviors.)

    This course aligns with the College Board’s learning goals for AP United States Government & Politics.

  • Virginia & U.S. Government

    Virginia & U.S. Government is designed to introduce students to the concepts of government and politics in both the United States and Virginia. As such, it considers foundational elements of the American system: the Constitution and its origins; the party system and related political behaviors and ideologies; various institutions related to government; conceptual origins of rights and liberties and the development of the Bill of Rights; and the role of government, from the federal to the state and local level.

    This course aligns with the Virginia Standards of Learning for Virginia & U.S. Government.